LGBT Art Village Pops Up in WeHo; Planet Queer, Apt 3f, Homo-Centric Present

West Hollywood’s El Tovar Place parking lot transformed into an underground arts village Sunday afternoon for “Install: WeHo,” a One City One Pride event.

The second annual event, this year titled “Good Queer,” showcased the work of LGBT artists examining what it means to be a “good queer.”

Partipants perused pop-up installations, many housed in U-Hauls scattered throughout the lot, while others watched performances on the main stage, or listened to artist q-and-a’s.

On the main stage, housed in a truck bed with red flames as a backdrop, Miss Barbie Q, an LA drag queen and performance artist, hosted a full afternoon of performances, which included artists from popular Silver Lake Akbar gay bar shows Planet Queer and Apt 3f. Homo-centric, which hosts readings for LGBTQI writers and performers at Stories Books and Cafe in Echo Park, also presented a number of storytellers.

Pop-up art installations included: a “What What” mini-putt course highlighting overlooked moments in LGBTQI history; Patrisse Cullors’ “Warriors: Dressed in Queer, Cloaked in Now” performance; Sarah Barnard’s “How Do You Know?” installation, which was made up from written and audio responses gathered from around the globe showing how language defines male and female identity; Brian Getnick and Bryatt Bryant’s “The Night’s Load,” a multimedia installation in which two outcasts haul what they remember and forget to the end of the road, and a “Legacy Garden Altar” inviting participants to “commune with the spirits of various LGBTQ figures from history,” and put on by The Lavender Effect.

Other installations included: “Slippage See/Saw” that triggered video clips from Sheila Malone and Gwynn Shanks; an installation from Amy Von Harrington titled “Minotaur challenges your inner beast. How good are you?”; Thinh Nguyen’s installation exploring the psychology of identity and sometimes fatal impact of heteronormative cultural constraints on the queer community; Suzanne Wright’s “LA Glory Holes,” an interactive video installation touching on sex, submission, humor, oddity, anonymity, science fiction and queer architecture; and Julie Tolention’s installation offering up a “private disco manifesto/installation.”

Below, see photos from freelance photographer Jon Viscott.

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Me
Me
9 years ago

très tragique….i’m glad they hid this hot mess behind the parking structure…..seriously west hollywood, SERIOUSLY????….is this really the best we can do as the “creative city”?….disappointing

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