Two WeHo Pocket Parks Named as Certified Wildlife Habitats

Havenhurst Park

Hard to imagine a wildlife habitat in an urban area as developed as West Hollywood is. Nonetheless, the city is now home to not one, but two certified wildlife habitats.

The city’s two pocket parks – Formosa Park and Havenhurst Park – have both been named certified wildlife habitats by the wildlife conservation nonprofit National Wildlife Federation (NWF).

The certified wildlife areas within the two parks are gardens which will primarily attract birds and butterflies plus insects like bees. However, the areas may also attract some small mammals, reptiles and amphibians. The wildlife areas contribute to the overall health of the ecosystem in an area.   

“This helps the city of West Hollywood meet its goals to become healthier, greener, and more wildlife-friendly,” said City Councilmember Lauren Meister. “Every habitat garden is a step toward replenishing resources for wildlife, such as bees, butterflies, and birds. Climate change is real, and each thing we do to help our urban wildlife helps in the fight against climate change.” 

Councilmember John D’Amico concurred.

“Supporting and welcoming back native plants and animals to our city is part of our larger sustainability efforts,” said D’Amico. “And we encourage everyone with a garden of any size to certify their garden asa community wildlife habitat with NWF.”

Wildlife habitats can be certified through a combination of five defined elements:

  • Food — Native plants provide food eaten by a variety of wildlife. Feeders can supplement natural food sources.
  • Water — All animals need water to survive, and some need it for bathing or breeding, as well.
  • Cover — Wildlife need places to take shelter from bad weather and places to hide from predators or hunt for prey.
  • Places to raise young — Wildlife need resources to reproduce, and to protect and nourish their young.
  • Sustainable practices — Maintenance performed in natural ways to ensure soil, air, and water stay healthy and clean.

Using a NWF  certification checklist,  Formosa Park has obtained 21 elements and Havenhurst Park has obtained 20 elements out of a minimum of ten elements required to receive certified wildlife habitat designation.

Formosa Park is located 1140 N. Formosa, just north of Santa Monica Boulevard. Havenhurst Park is located at 1351 Havenhurst Drive, just south of Sunset Boulevard. Both pocket parks were created in the late 2000s in conjunction with construction of an adjacent apartment building.

For more information about participating in NWF’s Certified Wildlife Habitats Program, please visit  www.nwf.org/garden-for-wildlife.

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Rob Bergstein
Rob Bergstein
1 month ago

I did the same for our front yard a number of years ago and love having the interaction between birds, butterflies and interesting California Native landscaping. That being said, the National Wildlife Federation, until I asked them to remove me from their mailing list, was sending me requests for donations every month, along with “gifts”–calendars, towels, garden gloves, etc. I’ve always felt that any charity that can spends so much of their money on marketing gifts, isn’t spending their money wisely and is not the type of non profit I want to continue supporting,

Vigilant
Vigilant
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob Bergstein

Have you considered contacting the BOD of NWF with your concerns? Unfortunately times have changed in the “non-profit” sector where once dedicated folks anxious to give to the table, now the concept has become “what can I take from the table”. Early supporters such as Frederick Law Olmstead, Marjorie Stoneman Douglas, John Muir, Rachel Carson and a host of others took this as their honored dedication rather than a “feather my nest” scheme in an effort to acquire public attention. West Hollywood is also remiss in this area when the Audubon Society was banished from Plummer Park during John Heilman’s… Read more »

Steve Martin
Steve Martin
1 month ago

The ability of “wildlife” to perpetuate itself in challenging urban environments attests to adaptability of many species but it is really difficult to see how we get any kudos for Havenhurst Park which is probably one of the least inviting areas for wildlife. But West Hollywood has a rich environment of hardy urban dwellers, many who are not human. If you just make a bit of effort you will be able to appreciate just how many “wild” urban animals make West Hollywood home.

RobbyDobby
RobbyDobby
1 month ago

There’s been an owl lurking in my neighborhood for the last few months. I imagine the wildlife habitats have contributed to the owl’s well being.

Vigilant
Vigilant
1 month ago
Reply to  RobbyDobby

Likewise, there is an owl occasionally visiting Laurel Place. It is discouraged from the folks disrespecting the “no off leash dog privileges” which not only degrades the living habitat but and the vegetation itself. There is also an owl in Spaulding Square with its lush vegetation and respectful residents. Our family place back east was called Hoot Owl Pond so I am quite familiar with not only owls but all resident wildlife. My Mother would have given a copy of Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring to everyone she ever met if she could have. As it was, she gave many, but… Read more »

Rob Bergstein
Rob Bergstein
1 month ago
Reply to  RobbyDobby

Yes, we’ve had one on Hampton for nearly 20 years as well!

Joshua88
Joshua88
1 month ago

I love it!

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