🚦 Speed limit might drop to 30 mph on Fairfax and Fountain

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At tonight’s Public Safety Commission meeting, Richard Garland from West Hollywood’s Engineering Division shared critical updates about the Traffic Speed Zone Survey, a state-mandated study that must be conducted every seven years.

The intent behind this survey is to ensure that the posted speed limits on various streets are justifiable. It’s an essential aspect of law enforcement as it allows the use of radar for speed monitoring. If the city fails to update this survey within seven years, individuals who are ticketed for speeding have a legal basis to challenge those citations, potentially getting them voided. The last time West Hollywood updated this data was in 2016, and the current survey is aimed at keeping the city within that seven-year window of compliance.

Garland elaborated that the preliminary findings from the survey suggest that most of the streets, 22 out of the 24 segments surveyed, have appropriate speed limits. Speed limits are determined based on the 85th percentile speed, which is a measure showing that 85% of drivers go below a certain speed while 15% go above. This is in line with state guidelines.

However, two significant changes were noted. The speed limits on Fairfax Avenue, spanning from the North City limit to the South City limit, and Fountain Avenue between La Cienega and Fairfax, are recommended to be lowered from 35 miles per hour to 30 miles per hour. City Council will certify these changes if they are approved.

During the Q&A session with the commission, specific concerns were raised about Fountain Avenue, known for its speeding issues. Vehicles tend to accelerate where the road changes from a single lane to a dual lane. Garland addressed these concerns by pointing out that the state’s stringent guidelines govern the setting of these speed limits. Starting from July of the next year, these guidelines will offer cities more flexibility, allowing for potentially lower speed limits.

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Another question was raised about North Doheny Drive, particularly the stretch between Santa Monica Boulevard and Sunset. Garland confirmed that the current speed limit of 35 mph on this segment was appropriate, based on the 85th percentile speed.

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Take Responsibility
Take Responsibility
4 months ago

Meant to clarify that the East/West traffic lanes would be reduced to a single lane to allow uninterrupted bike lanes fro. La Cienega to La Brea. This seems backwards, another feel good PR project that does not realistically make sense for the residents.

Take Responsibility
Take Responsibility
4 months ago

It would be hard to forgo commenting regarding Bicyclist Kevin Burton’s astute observations about speed limits and sidewalks on Fountain Ave. Likewise it would be reasonable to have Mr. Burton also attest to the fact that he sees very few bicycles on Fountain even while living on Fountain yet has enthusiastically endorsed the City pilot project to reduce East/West travel to a single lane in each direction. Why one might ask would he not be astutely truthful to the City and recommend initially repairing the sidewalks that he has witnessed not being ADA compliant and basically problematic for mobile walking… Read more »

JCB
JCB
4 months ago

It’s funny that you ignore the number of people who would bike Fountain Avenue if it actually had safe infrastructure. Have you ever been to a Ciclavia event? There are thousands of people in Los Angeles who would bike more regularly if they didn’t think they would constantly be killed by speeding cars.

If WeHo and LA want to accomodate more residents (something called growth) then we need to consider a multi-modal strategy…especially since 50% of the country is obese.

Take Responsibility
Take Responsibility
4 months ago
Reply to  JCB

Have not ignored the possibility and yes I’m aware of the Ciclavia numbers, however we are not Amsterdam or other European countries who have entirely different lifestyles ie you comment about obesity. It seems that bike riders might be more plentiful in Weho however they care not to be “inconvenienced” by riding on side street which are more manageable, generally safer and certainly more picturesque. The concept that the numbers of potential residents will magically turn into bike riders and play amateur Tour de France on Fountain is dream worthy but not practical when all the elements and the downside… Read more »

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